Option: Make Infographic through Canva and make the tiles clickable. They would then open up into a lightbox with their full text description. Here are a few layout examples, done very quickly. They can all be easily edited (different symbology, colour, font, size, images, placement, ect)
 
Making portions of an image clickable requires a WordPress plugin called DrawAttention. I’ve installed the free version to make the Niagara Municipality map (previous page) clickable. The free version only allows you to work with one image. If we want to make unlimited images on our site clickable, we have to pay a yearly fee of $74.
Option: Image Accordion

Threads Through Time: Niagara Region & Ontario

Indian Council House

Established in 1797 by the Indian Department, the Indian Council House was a place where British officials held meetings with Indigenous nations. It was located in Niagara-on-the-Lake near the newly constructed Fort George, but was destroyed during the War of 1812. A second Council House was built and remained operative as a meeting place until 1828. During these three decades, the Indian Council House became a key centre of diplomacy between the British and their Indigenous allies. Treaties were negotiated and large group discussions were had, including a ‘Council of Condolence’ held for General Brock on November 6th, 1812.This point of interest was a symbol of Indigenous-settler relations during an important transitional period within Niagara’s history. The Indian Council House was turned into a military hospital and the site with its additional barracks and storehouses became known as Butler’s Barracks by the mid-nineteenth century. It remained in use as a military headquarters and training ground within the Niagara region well into the 20th century.

Treaty of Niagara

The Treaty of Niagara was a foundational agreement formed in 1764 between the British Crown and approximately twenty-four Indigenous Nations. The treaty included pledges of loyalty as well as land agreements; the negotiated peace signified by the exchange of wampum belts. The Covenant Chain Wampum was offered by Sir William Johnson to the Western Confederacy at the close of the Council of Niagara, following two months of discussion. The treaty solidified Indigenous-settler relations in Upper Canada well into the 19th century.

Molly Brant

Molly Brant, known as Koñwatsi’tsiaiéñni, was a prominent Mohawk figure who resided in different parts of New York state and Upper Canada during the mid-late 18th century. As indicated in this commemorative stamp, Brant’s life was multifaceted as she was both a leader to the Six Nations and a devoted Loyalist as the wife of Sir William Johnson. Her legacy as a mediator and negotiator lives on as an important piece of Ontario’s colonial history.

John Norton & John Brant

“Niagara’s Landscape of Nations includes two sculpted figures in Native clothing, feathers standing up from their headdresses. Their plinths identify the one on the left as John Norton and the one on the right as John Brant. Both were Six Nations war captains at the Battle of Queenston Heights during the War of 1812.”

Option: Image Carousel
Option: Post Images and Text individually, and users have to scroll down from one to the next.

POI: Indian Council House

Established in 1797 by the Indian Department, the Indian Council House was a place where British officials held meetings with Indigenous nations. It was located in Niagara-on-the-Lake near the newly constructed Fort George, but was destroyed during the War of 1812. A second Council House was built and remained operative as a meeting place until 1828. During these three decades, the Indian Council House became a key centre of diplomacy between the British and their Indigenous allies. Treaties were negotiated and large group discussions were had, including a ‘Council of Condolence’ held for General Brock on November 6th, 1812. This point of interest was a symbol of Indigenous-settler relations during an important transitional period within Niagara’s history. The Indian Council House was turned into a military hospital and the site with its additional barracks and storehouses became known as Butler’s Barracks by the mid-nineteenth century. It remained in use as a military headquarters and training ground within the Niagara region well into the 20th century.

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